But, how much Native are you? Like what percent?  2019.  Made lands of the Pueblo of Sandia.   But, how much Native are you? Like what percent?  comments on blood quantum and the many times I have been questioned about the percentage of Inupiaq ⁣(Kingikmuit) blood I “possess.” These questions show me that colonialism is ever-present. My Indigenous lineage is often reduced to a pedigree; the same measure horses' and dogs' "worth" is derived. This ignores my cultural traditions, ties to ancestral lands, the community I am a part of, and the knowledge and history that’s been shared with me from my family and the elders in my life. I am continually learning and unlearning.  As an Indigenous person to what are now called Alaska and the United States, I must hold a card "confirming" my Inupiaq blood percentage, as determined by a United States federal government policy. This Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaska Native Blood (CDIB) card is required for me to maintain my political rights as a tribal citizen. This CDIB card fails to acknowledge the many qualities that make me Inupiaq as well as the valued connections I have to my family and ancestors.   The viewers are invited in with a soft self-portrait and met with the redundant text, ⁣"What percent?" which is the same color as my skin. My Indigeneity is far more than the colonizers' way of measuring Indigenous peoples.

But, how much Native are you? Like what percent? 2019.

Made lands of the Pueblo of Sandia.

But, how much Native are you? Like what percent? comments on blood quantum and the many times I have been questioned about the percentage of Inupiaq ⁣(Kingikmuit) blood I “possess.” These questions show me that colonialism is ever-present. My Indigenous lineage is often reduced to a pedigree; the same measure horses' and dogs' "worth" is derived. This ignores my cultural traditions, ties to ancestral lands, the community I am a part of, and the knowledge and history that’s been shared with me from my family and the elders in my life. I am continually learning and unlearning.

As an Indigenous person to what are now called Alaska and the United States, I must hold a card "confirming" my Inupiaq blood percentage, as determined by a United States federal government policy. This Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaska Native Blood (CDIB) card is required for me to maintain my political rights as a tribal citizen. This CDIB card fails to acknowledge the many qualities that make me Inupiaq as well as the valued connections I have to my family and ancestors.

The viewers are invited in with a soft self-portrait and met with the redundant text, ⁣"What percent?" which is the same color as my skin. My Indigeneity is far more than the colonizers' way of measuring Indigenous peoples.